"I have to understand the world, you see."

One of my unexpected favorite reads this year was "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!": Adventures of a Curious Character. A biography from Richard Feynman, an American physicist you might have heard of.

Learn what the rest of the world is like. The variety is worthwhile.

I consider books worth recommending based on one of two things: it gave me something I’ll benefit from, or it was an incredible piece of art. This belongs in the former category. But it also happened to be one of the more amusing books I read this year, simply because Richard Feynman is a fascinating human who knows how to entertain. 

While it's easy to just read it like a collection of anecdotes, it also holds a lot of insights, stories that might just help you see life a little bit different. Here are a few highlights I enjoy going back to. 

So I found hypnosis to be a very interesting experience. All the time you’re saying to yourself, “I could do that, but I won’t”—which is just another way of saying that you can’t.
It was a brilliant idea: You have no responsibility to live up to what other people think you ought to accomplish. I have no responsibility to be like they expect me to be. It’s their mistake, not my failing.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself—and you are the easiest person to fool. So you have to be very careful about that. After you’ve not fooled yourself, it’s easy not to fool other scientists. You just have to be honest in a conventional way after that.
I’m talking about a specific, extra type of integrity that is not lying, but bending over backwards to show how you’re maybe wrong, that you ought to have when acting as a scientist. And this is our responsibility as scientists, certainly to other scientists, and I think to laymen.

You don't have to be interested in physics to enjoy this. Just being a bit curious will be enough.